Author Archives: whbbeekeepers

Winter arrives…some advice from Uncle Drone

Dear Auntie Bee and Uncle Drone

It’s got suddenly quite cold over this 10 days and I’m concerned about how my bees may be coping in early winter. Do you have any recommendations for this time of year?

Uncle Drone replies:

Hi concerned beekeeper.  By now your bees should have been well fed in October followed by a Varroa treatment and protected from the woodpeckers in November.  Assuming that these preparations went ok, all that can be done now is to watch and check the hive security for a while and keep hefting.
Watch to see if they are finding and taking in pollen, how many are flying, what temperatures they are flying at, look in the entrance to see if it is blocked by dead bees, if there are dead bees out front what age are they?
The thing here is that the bees should be just hanging in a state of quiescence and not leaving the hive except to excrete or find nectar and pollen.
If a hive goes light give it fondant, not excessive amounts, but they can take 3-500g in a week if they need it.  My preference is to give them some anyway as an Xmas present following a Varroa treatment which should be timed to around Xmas or New Year following a few days of cold.
Enjoy Xmas and have a glass of mead to toast the bees.
Uncle Drone
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Branch membership for 2016/17

For anyone who has not yet returned their completed membership form to Roger, the form can be downloaded here – whb-renewal-16-17

Membership runs from 1st October so please do return the form as soon as you can, so that we can be sure of our numbers for the coming year. For any of our new people who want to take part in branch activities and join in even though they haven’t got their own bees yet, please sign up under the ‘Friend’ category. The same would apply to any colleagues giving up their hives and moving away from active beekeeping.

Beekeeping with Asian Hornets around

This blog post offers some very interesting insights and ideas from France, about working to keep honeybee colonies safe in the presence of Asian Hornets.

Beekeeping with Asian hornets in France

The beauty of pollen

The picture below was taken by Lincolnshire beekeeper Simon Croson, yesterday. The range of colours is a wide one but the dominance of the purple/mauve pollen was probably down to a local field crop of Phacelia, he thinks. Such a beautiful mix of colours and bee nutrition evident in that photo.

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Whitstable’s ‘Funday Sunday’ 2016

Just a reminder that the branch will have a stall at this event, this coming Sunday, 12th June. We will be talking to interested members of the public about honeybees (and other bee species), selling honey, wax, candles, etc, and generally enjoying the event. We will be using our bright and cheerful yellow and black gazebo, so that’s what to look out for. Fingers crossed for good weather.

Spring feeding

A concerned beekeeper asks:
Dear Auntie Bee and Uncle Drone

Is it a good idea to give my bees some syrup and/or pollen patties at this time of year, to help the queen start laying and the colony to build up after a rather cold and miserable March? I don’t want to encourage too much growth but it has been really chilly for them so far.

Uncle Drone answers:

Yes, now we are into April the bees should be bringing in pollen and this stimulates brood rearing.  If they are not then you should watch carefully over a period of time in case they have not found a good source of pollen yet.  Pollen is the protein that bees need to produce the brood food needed for the developing larva and the queen so supplementing this can help but is not always necessary if the weather is adequate to provide several hours foraging per day.

The extra syrup and/or fondant can be essential if their stocks are low and the bees get confined to the hive by low temperatures and wet conditions, either way it will not hurt to add a little extra and it will be converted into more bees at this time of year rather than stored.

A down side to adding pollen patties and syrup/fondant is that they will stimulate the colony and in a months time or before the bees can be thinking of swarming, so you need to be prepared for this and avoid letting them get too cramped by keeping to weekly inspections/ checks and adding space as necessary.