Author Archives: whbbeekeepers

Taster Day , 22 July 2017

A one-day event for members of the public who would like to know more about honey bees and beekeeping, either to see if they might wish to become beekeepers themselves or simply to learn a little about such a fascinating activity. To be held at the branch’s training apiary on the University of Kent campus at Canterbury.

We will start the day at 10.30 in the potting shed/training room where the W&HB branch Education Officer, Julie Coleman, will give a couple of hours instruction on the theory of modern beekeeping, together with some practical tips.  This will be interspersed with some hands on practical work and plenty of tea and coffee. At 12.30 we will break for lunch: we can provide tea, coffee, cold drinks, and biscuits. but please bring a packed lunch.

After lunch, about 1.30 we will suit up in protective clothing provided and go into the apiary to look at the hives.  You will be required to bring wellingtons or similar – something the suit can tuck into so there are no gaps, and marigold type washing up gloves.  A long sleeve shirt may also be advised as bees can occasionally sting through suits.  There will be several experienced beekeepers on hand so we can split into small groups where we can demonstrate handling bees and you can have a go if you wish.

We will then retire back to the shed where you can enjoy a hard earned cuppa and we can answer any questions and discuss the way forward if you decide beekeeping may be of interest to you.  We should finish by 4.00 depending on how the day goes and the number of questions we have along the way.  Beekeeping is a complex and fascinating pastime and there are always more questions than answers and always at least three answers to any question.

We have decided to levy a £10 fee for this event, payable on the day.  If you wish, we can use this for you to become a Friend of the branch when memberships renew at the end of September.  You will receive newsletters detailing monthly meetings and notices of events including our winter programme.  You will also be able to attend our apiary inspections with Keith, our apiary manager, on Friday or Saturday mornings.  If you decide not to continue we will take the £10 as a donation to branch funds, so we will be able to purchase more protective clothing for similar events in the future.  You can upgrade this to full membership when you have bees of your own and have completed our Beginners’ Course.

The branch will be offering a full Beginners’ Course in September 2017, with further details to be confirmed nearer the time.

Anyone interested in this event should contact the Branch Secretary, Amanda Lee-Riley as soon as possible, via the contact details shown on our ‘About us’ page, shown above.

‘It’s a bee’ – but what sort of bee?

Most beekeepers will be familiar with someone (often a non-beekeeper) asking for help in identifying a bee that has been seen in their garden. The Bumblebee Conservation Trust has a lot of helpful information on their website on the differences between the various species of bumbles as compared to our honeybees. This page – http://bumblebeeconservation.org/about-bees/faqs/honeybees-vs-bumblebees/ – goes through some of the most obvious differences and is a useful place to recommend for information.

When it comes to identifying a bee that is obviously not a bumble but not a honeybee either, then two websites have particularly useful guides: the Wildlife Trusts’ page at http://www.wildlifetrusts.org/reserves-wildlife/guide-solitary-bees-britain and the Grow Wild page at https://www.growwilduk.com/content/everything-you-need-know-about-solitary-bees provide very readable information on the 250+ species of solitary bees in the UK.

Winter arrives…some advice from Uncle Drone

Dear Auntie Bee and Uncle Drone

It’s got suddenly quite cold over this 10 days and I’m concerned about how my bees may be coping in early winter. Do you have any recommendations for this time of year?

Uncle Drone replies:

Hi concerned beekeeper.  By now your bees should have been well fed in October followed by a Varroa treatment and protected from the woodpeckers in November.  Assuming that these preparations went ok, all that can be done now is to watch and check the hive security for a while and keep hefting.
Watch to see if they are finding and taking in pollen, how many are flying, what temperatures they are flying at, look in the entrance to see if it is blocked by dead bees, if there are dead bees out front what age are they?
The thing here is that the bees should be just hanging in a state of quiescence and not leaving the hive except to excrete or find nectar and pollen.
If a hive goes light give it fondant, not excessive amounts, but they can take 3-500g in a week if they need it.  My preference is to give them some anyway as an Xmas present following a Varroa treatment which should be timed to around Xmas or New Year following a few days of cold.
Enjoy Xmas and have a glass of mead to toast the bees.
Uncle Drone

Branch membership for 2016/17

For anyone who has not yet returned their completed membership form to Roger, the form can be downloaded here – whb-renewal-16-17

Membership runs from 1st October so please do return the form as soon as you can, so that we can be sure of our numbers for the coming year. For any of our new people who want to take part in branch activities and join in even though they haven’t got their own bees yet, please sign up under the ‘Friend’ category. The same would apply to any colleagues giving up their hives and moving away from active beekeeping.

Beekeeping with Asian Hornets around

This blog post offers some very interesting insights and ideas from France, about working to keep honeybee colonies safe in the presence of Asian Hornets.

Beekeeping with Asian hornets in France